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Exeter researcher wins Lister Prize

A University of Exeter researcher has won the prestigious Lister Prize to support her research into fungal pathogens.

Numbers and experience count in mongoose warfare

Strength in numbers and experienced individuals are both vital in mongoose warfare, new research shows.

New research gives insights into how organelles divide in cells

A pioneering study has shed new light on how subcellular organelles divide and multiply.

Science Futures to make Glastonbury debut

Festivalgoers can learn about climate change, space travel, plant power and much more at Glastonbury's new Science Futures area.

Otters learn from each other – but solve some puzzles alone

Otters learn skills from each other – but they also solve some mysteries alone, new research shows.

Free Soapbox Science talks in Exeter

Fish on painkillers, the power of tiny shrimps and late-night snacking by bumblebees are just some of the subjects on offer at this year's Soapbox Science in Exeter.

Scientists show how fast-growing bacteria can resist antibiotics

Scientists have demonstrated how some fast-growing bacteria can resist treatment with antibiotics, according to a study published today in eLife.

Exeter doctoral student wins prestigious medal for "extraordinary" research

A prestigious medal for the UK’s best PhD thesis in biology has been awarded to Dr Timothy Lamont, for his PhD work at the University of Exeter.

AI learns coral reef "song"

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can track the health of coral reefs by learning the "song of the reef", new research shows.

British coral predicted to be resilient to climate change

An iconic coral species found in UK waters could expand its range due to climate change, new research shows.

'Fuel of evolution' more abundant than previously thought in wild animals

The raw material for evolution is much more abundant in wild animals than we previously believed, according to new research from the Australian National University (ANU).

Drug resistance molecule can spread though bacterial 'communities'

DNA molecules called plasmids – some of which protect bacteria from antibiotics – can spread rapidly through bacterial "communities" that are treated with antibiotics, new research shows.

Pioneering study identifies global dynamics of Antibiotic Resistance

Scientists have used ideas from artificial intelligence to identify patterns of antibiotic resistance around the world.

'Democracy' governs mass jackdaw take-offs

Jackdaws use a "democratic" process to decide when to leave their roosts en masse, new research shows.

'Make or break' year for protecting nature

2022 is a "make or break" year for protecting nature and tackling climate change, a leading scientist says.

'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs

Coral reef fish breed more successfully if motorboat noise is reduced, new research shows.

Satellites and drones can help save pollinators

Satellites and drones can provide key information to protect pollinators, researchers say.

Scallops swim into illuminated fishing pots

Scallops are drawn to illuminated fishing pots like moths to a flame, new research shows.

Sea turtle success stories along African east coast – but thousands still dying

Conservation of sea turtles along Africa's east coast has made good progress – but tens of thousands still die each year due to human activity, researchers say.

Peru "pinger" trial deters dolphins but not whales

A trial of underwater sound devices called pingers reduced the number of dolphins caught in fishing nets – but did not deter humpback whales.

Research ship delves into ocean history

A research ship is taking seabed samples from the North Sea and North Atlantic to find out what the oceans were like before major changes caused by humans.

UK wildlife watchers welcome "ecological refugees"

Wildlife watchers generally welcome species that have arrived in the UK due to climate change, new research suggests.

Protected areas don’t always boost biodiversity

Protected areas such as national parks have a "mixed impact" on wildlife, according to the largest ever global study of their effects.

Multi-million funding for new 'terrestrial blue economy' research

A pioneering new research project, designed to unlock the true potential of sustainable shrimp production in the UK using renewable energy technology, has received a multi-million pound funding boost.

'Whup' and 'grumble' calls reveal secrets of humpback whales

Sounds made by humpback whales – including a previously unknown call – have given researchers a glimpse of their lives in the high seas.

Selective breeding sustainably protects honey bees from Varroa mite

A new breed of honey bees provides a major advance in the global fight against the parasitic Varroa mite, new research shows.

African network protects key turtle sites

A network of West African Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) covers key sites used by green turtles, new research shows.

Remote Indian Ocean reefs bounce back quickly after bleaching

Coral reefs in remote or protected areas can recover quickly after mass coral bleaching events, new research shows.

Modern animal life could have origins in delta

The ancestors of many animal species alive today may have lived in a delta in what is now China, new research suggests.

Researchers aim to discover how viruses communicate

The different "languages" used by viruses will be investigated by a new research project at the University of Exeter.

Voles cut grass to watch flying predators

A tiny rodent trims tall grasses so it can watch the skies for flying predators, new research shows.

Half century of protection pays off for sea turtles

Green turtle numbers continue to rise on a group of islands where the species has now been protected for more than 50 years, new research shows.

LEAF status for all Exeter labs

All eligible laboratories at the University of Exeter have now achieved Laboratory Efficiency Assessment Framework (LEAF) accreditation.

Female chimpanzees avoid humans

Female chimpanzees are less likely than males to go near villages and farmland used by humans, new research shows.

Whole-genome sequencing reveals new secrets about killer fungus

New research from the University of Exeter reports largest ever whole-genome sequencing project for the potentially fatal yeast infection Candida glabrata from hospitals across Scotland

Plastic labelling needs 'sustainability scale'

Labelling of plastic products needs a drastic overhaul including a new "sustainability scale" to help consumers, researchers say.

Racing looks through eyes of horses to help deliver improved safety at all British jump courses

Racing at Stratford Upon Avon on 14 March will mark the start of a new era over jumps in Britain as obstacles begin turning white as part of a welfare-driven project to develop new ways to help make hurdle and fence design safer.

Bid to protect "blue food" revolution

Scientists have developed a new way to identify and reduce the impact of chemicals and diseases in global aquaculture (fish farming).

Leading UK marine scientists welcome move towards global plastics pact ahead of major UN meeting

Plastic pollution is universally accepted as having dire effects on the world’s marine life and ecosystems, in addition to presenting risks to human health including through the leaching of chemical additives and consumption of microplastics contained in seafood

'Freeze or flee' reactions run in fish families

Families of fish tend to share similar reactions to stressful situations, new research shows.

UK biodiversity renewal project to revive nature and communities receives £10 million investment

Researchers at the University of Exeter have received £10 million to investigate and tackle biodiversity loss in the UK through partnerships and community action.

Three Exeter researchers win Discovery Fellowships

Three University of Exeter researchers have been awarded prestigious Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) Discovery Fellowships.

Gabon provides blueprint for protecting oceans

Gabon's network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) provides a blueprint that could be used in many other countries, experts say.

How do pathogens learn to be pathogens: partnerships between microbes leading to human disease

New research discovered that the fungus Rhizopus fights back against soil predators and human immune cells by partnering with a bacteria called Ralstonia in a two way partnership.

Exeter biologists investigate smallest propeller on earth

University of Exeter scientists have discovered new information about the tiny propellers used by single-cell organisms called archaea.

Bid to discover how immune systems recognise fungal invaders

A new research programme aims to define the vital first step in how human immune systems recognise fungal invaders.

English Channel stops new rockpool species reaching UK

The English Channel prevents many rockpool species "making the jump" from Europe to the UK, new research shows.

Fish study shows role of oestrogens in sense of smell

Steroid oestrogens play an important role as embryos develop a sense of smell, new research shows.

Bluefin tuna tagged for the first time in UK waters with acoustic ‘residency’ tags

Bluefin tuna have been tagged with state-of-the-art acoustic tracking tags for the first time in UK waters.

Bid to understand how bacterial defences affect the spread of 'mobile genetic elements'

A major new project will investigate how bacterial defences influence the spread of segments of DNA called mobile genetic elements (MGEs) between bacteria.

New discovery on regulation of organelle contact

A pioneering study has revealed how cellular compartments (organelles) are able to control how much they interact and cooperate.

New bacteria in UK waters as temperatures rise

Rising temperatures are causing a "growing diversity" of Vibrio bacteria in the sea around the UK, new research shows.

New research moves closer to harnessing viruses to fight bacteria and reduce antibiotic use

New research has moved a step closer to harnessing viruses to fight bacterial infection, reducing the threat of antibiotic resistance.

 

Unique data creates 'fair and robust' online exams

Researchers have developed a new way of reinforcing "fair and robust" online exams, a study reports.

Newly discovered fish songs demonstrate reef restoration success

Whoops, croaks, growls, raspberries and foghorns are among the sounds that demonstrate the success of a coral reef restoration project.

Big-city coastal whales consume millions of microplastics every day

Whales in New Zealand's Hauraki Gulf consume about three million microplastics per day, a new study has found.

Extent of migration of sooty terns presents conservation challenges

Sooty terns’ wide-ranging migration patterns present big challenges for conservationists working to understand and address a sharp population decline, according to scientists.

Social media firms can tackle wildlife trade

Wildlife trading on social media is a complex issue – but tech firms can take steps to tackle it, according to new research.

Exeter lab manager wins Sustainability Champion Award

A University of Exeter lab manager has been named a "Sustainability Champion" in the 2021 Green Gown Awards UK & Ireland.

Exeter academics on list of top researchers

Twenty-two University of Exeter academics have been named on an annual list of highly cited researchers.

Exeter laboratories gain LEAF status

More than 80% of eligible laboratories and research spaces at the University of Exeter have now been assessed via the Laboratory Efficiency Assessment Framework (LEAF).

COP26: Plastic pollution trackers released off Scotland

On the penultimate day of COP26, scientists have deployed plastic pollution tracking devices into the ocean around Scotland.

Convex launches Seascape Survey Partnership with Blue Marine Foundation

Convex Group Limited (Convex) today announces a multi-million-dollar partnership with the Blue Marine Foundation (BLUE), a charity dedicated to restoring the ocean to health, and the University of Exeter and its foremost researchers, with the launch ofthe Convex Blue Carbon Seascape Survey. 

Leprosy confirmed in wild chimpanzees

Leprosy has been found in wild chimpanzees for the first time, a new study reveals.

Cats' whiskers reveal felines favour free lunch

Domestic cats that regularly catch wild animals still get most of their nutrition from food provided at home, new research shows.

Desert teamwork explains global pattern of co-operation in birds

A new study from the Kalahari Desert finds that teamwork allows birds to cope with brutally unpredictable environments.

 

Hoverflies navigate using sun and body clock

Hoverflies use a combination of the sun and their body clock to navigate when they fly south for the winter, new research shows.

Artificial Intelligence could help predict harmful algal blooms

A new project will develop Artificial Intelligence tools to predict harmful blooms of algae in the ocean.

Rapid increase in global light pollution

Global light pollution has increased by at least 49% over 25 years, new research shows.

Unrealistic experiments mean true impact of nitrogen pollution on the environment is unknown, study warns

Unrealistic scientific experiments mean the true impact of nitrogen pollution on the environment remains poorly understood, a new study warns.

Crop farmers face new disease pressures as climate changes

Climate change will increase the burden of crop diseases in some parts of the world and reduce it in others, new research suggests.

Plastic creates 'evolutionary trap' for young sea turtles

Plastic pollution creates an "evolutionary trap" for young sea turtles, new research shows.

Warning over start of commercial-scale deep-sea mining

Deep-sea mining in international waters could begin in two years – but researchers say this is unnecessary and could cause irreversible damage to marine ecosystems.

Hands, face, space to protect great apes

Tourists who visit Africa's gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos should follow social distancing rules, researchers say.

Red Dead Redemption 2 teaches players about wildlife

Players of the popular game Red Dead Redemption 2 learn how to identify real American wildlife, new research shows.

Light pollution has complex effects on animal vision

Changes in the colour and intensity of light pollution over the past few decades result in complex and unpredictable effects on animal vision, new research shows.

Seabird colony creates 'halo' of depleted fish stocks

A vast seabird colony on Ascension Island creates a "halo" in which fewer fish live, new research shows.

£250,000 kickstart for University of Exeter microbiologist

Dr Stineke Van Houte has received £250,000 to support her research into antimicrobial resistance.

Jackdaws don't console traumatised mates

Male jackdaws don't stick around to console their mate after a traumatic experience, new research shows.

Cornish farmers could unlock 'natural capital' worth millions

Cornwall's farmers could unlock "natural capital" worth millions of pounds, a new report suggests.

COVID-19’s socio-economic fallout threatens global coffee industry

COVID-19’s socio-economic effects will likely cause another severe production crisis in the coffee industry, according to new research.

Bird migration takes plants in wrong direction to cope with climate change

Migratory birds carry most seeds in the wrong direction to help plants cope with climate change, new research shows.

Mongooses solve inequality problem

A fair society has evolved in banded mongooses because parents don’t know which pups are their own, new research shows.

Seabird eggs contaminated with cocktail of plastic additives

Chemical additives used in plastic production have been found in herring gull eggs, new research shows.

Turtle's tale reveals dual fishing threat

The story of a turtle caught twice in fishing nets reveals a dual threat facing many ocean animals.

G7 'legacy' project launched to protect and restore nature across Cornwall

The UK government has pledged an initial £700,000 for a nature recovery project in Cornwall as a "legacy" of this week's G7 summit.

Research project receives €6M to boost greener consumer products in Europe using innovative biotechnology

A pioneering, pan-European research project, designed to boost greener industrial processes for more sustainable daily consumer products like cosmetics or foods, has been launched. 

Experiments show natural selection opposes sexual selection

Natural selection can reverse evolution that occurs through sexual selection and this can lead to better females, new research shows.

Plastic project launches bottle for each G7 nation

On World Ocean Day, June 8, a collaboration of scientific institutions and ocean groups from around the world will launch scientific monitoring devices into the ocean.

South West scores 65 out of 100 for ocean health

South West England has scored 65 out of 100 for ocean health, a new report reveals.

New findings show pigeons act selflessly when under threat

A new study of pigeons has revealed that they flock together in the presence of predators for the collective benefit, rather than for selfish interest. 

Plastic in Galapagos seawater, beaches and animals

Plastic pollution has been found in seawater, on beaches and inside marine animals at the Galapagos Islands. 

Exeter researcher wins prestigious paediatric infectious diseases award

Professor Adilia Warris, co-director of The MRC Centre for Medical Mycology based at the University of Exeter, has received this year’s Bill Marshall Award for her pioneering paediatric infectious diseases research.

Road verges provide opportunity for wildflowers, bees and trees

Road verges cover 1.2% of land in Great Britain – an area the size of Dorset – and could be managed to help wildlife, new research shows.

G7 ministers must 'listen to the science'

G7 ministers meeting this week must "listen to the science" and protect the world's ocean, according to researchers and conversation organisations.

New tools needed to prevent plant disease pandemics

Plant disease surveillance, improved detection systems and predictive modelling – integrated at the global scale – are necessary to mitigate future plant disease outbreaks and protect the global food supply, researchers say.

Study uncovers drivers of fishers' decisions of where to fish

A team of researchers from ZSL’s Institute of Zoology and the University of Exeter, alongside Oceanswell, have used a new approach to understand the movement and drivers of commercial fishing fleet activity in one of the world’s most over-exploited oceans.

Mediterranean turtles recovering at different rates

Numbers of two Mediterranean turtle species have risen in the last three decades – but in Cyprus the recoveries are happening at different rates, new research shows.

Sharks in protected area attract illegal fishers

Thousands of sharks have been illegally caught in a Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the Indian Ocean, new research shows.

Cayman Islands sea turtles back from the brink

Sea turtles in the Cayman Islands are recovering from the brink of local extinction, new research shows.

Ship traffic dropped during first months of Covid pandemic

Ship movements on the world's oceans dropped in the first half of 2020 as Covid-19 restrictions came into force, a new study shows.

UK waters are home again to the bluefin tuna

Atlantic bluefin tuna have returned to UK waters and can once again be seen during the summer and autumn months.

Exeter academics awarded grants for pioneering fungal research

Two scientists from the The MRC Centre for Medical Mycology, based at the University of Exeter, have received prestigious Springboard Awards from The Academy of Medical Sciences for their research into a deadly fungal disease.

Five-year funding boost for fungal research centre

A leading fungal research centre has received a further five years' funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC).

Scientists discover unique Cornish 'falgae'

Red algae that grow in Cornwall's Fal Estuary are genetically unique, new research shows.

Friends and enemies 'make sense' for long-lived animals

It makes evolutionary sense for long-lived animals to have complex social relationships – such as friends and enemies – researchers say.

Ocean's mammals at crucial crossroads

The ocean’s mammals are at a crucial crossroads – with some at risk of extinction and others showing signs of recovery, researchers say.

Gray’s beaked whales 'resilient' to ecosystem changes

An elusive whale species in the Southern Ocean could be resilient to near-future ecosystem changes, according to a new study by the universities of Exeter and Copenhagen.

Amphibians that produce fewer offspring have increased extinction risk

The risk of extinction among amphibians – the most endangered animals on the planet – increases for species that produce fewer babies per birth, new research shows.

New findings about immune system reaction to malaria and sickle cell disease

Scientists have discovered in more detail than ever before how the human body’s immune system reacts to malaria and sickle cell disease.

Fishers at risk in 'perfect storm'

Stormier weather will increasingly force fishers to choose between their safety and income, researchers say.

€4 million project uses cutting-edge technology to enhance the habitats of key fish species

A cross-Channel partnership will use innovative underwater acoustic tracking technology to identify the environmental conditions a range of important marine species need in order to thrive.

Female gannets go the extra mile to feed chicks

Female gannets travel further than male gannets to find fish for their chicks in some years but not others, new research shows.

Rarest seal breeding site discovered

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown breeding site used by the world's rarest seal species.

Global warming poses threat to food chains

Rising temperatures could reduce the efficiency of food chains and threaten the survival of larger animals, new research shows.

Exeter researcher writes book for Attenborough series

A University of Exeter scientist has written a book to accompany a new Sir David Attenborough TV series.

Chimpanzees and humans share overlapping territories

Chimpanzees and humans "overlap" in their use of forests and even villages, new research shows.

Cell biology specialist joins fungal research team

A specialist in cell biology and genetics is set to join the University of Exeter’s leading fungal research centre.

Play and meaty food reduce hunting by cats

Domestic cats hunt wildlife less if owners play with them daily and feed them a meat-rich food, new research shows.

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows.

Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes

Oceans were once filled with the sounds of nature, but overfishing, climate change and human noise have fundamentally changed the natural underwater "soundtrack", researchers say.

Ocean sharks and rays threatened with extinction

Three quarters of ocean shark and ray species face an elevated risk of extinction, according to new research.

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria

Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".

Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success

Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.

Exeter researcher receives prestigious Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (ASAB) Award

Dr Neeltje Boogert from the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall has won the 2021 ASAB Christopher Barnard Award for Outstanding Contributions by a New Investigator.

Grey camouflage 'better than zebra stripes'

Dull, featureless camouflage provides better protection from predators than zebra stripes, according to a new study.

New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation

Scientists have discovered how diatoms (a globally important group of eukaryotic algae) sense the availability of phosphorus, a vital macronutrient that controls diatom growth and productivity in the oceans.