Skip to main content

Profile

Loading content

Dr Lisa Bickley

Industrial Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

 Geoffrey Pope 201

 

Geoffrey Pope Building, University of Exeter , Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QD, UK

 Office hours:

0.5 FTE Monday - Thursday (please note I am not available on Fridays)

Overview

I have a broad background in environmental and aquatic biology, and work on collaborative projects between academia, industry and government bodies.

To date my research specialisms include:

  • Aquatic (eco)toxicology; assessing the impacts of chemical, physical and biological stressors on aquatic organisms (e.g. fish); extrapolating effects measured in model species in the laboratory to adverse effects on wildlife populations and communities.
  • Sustainable aquaculture development; understanding host-pathogen interactions in ecologically and commercially important diseases of aquaculture; developing molecular resources for use within the sector; developing more sustainable aquaculture practices both in the UK and globally.

My current role focuses on project development and delivery in support of the collaborative Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture Futures (https://www.exeter.ac.uk/research/saf/), a joint initiative between the Centre for Environment, Aquaculture and Fisheries Science (Cefas) and the University of Exeter.

Qualifications

2003-2007 PhD Environmental & Molecular Fish Ecotoxicology, University of Exeter

2002-2003 MSc Biological Research Methods, University of Exeter

1998-2001 BSc (Hons) Biology, University of Nottingham

Career

2018 – Present Industrial Post-Doctoral Research Fellow: Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture Futures (SAF), University of Exeter (and Cefas)

2012 – 2017 Research Fellow: Biosciences, University of Exeter

2016 – 2017 Impact Associate: Innovation, Impact and Business (0.2 FTE), University of Exeter

2011 – 2012 Associate Research Fellow (0.5 FTE)/Associate Teaching Fellow (0.5 FTE): Biosciences, University of Exeter

2010 – 2011 Knowledge Transfer Partnership Associate: University of Exeter and AstraZeneca

2008 – 2009 Associate Research Fellow: Biosciences, University of Exeter

2007 – 2008 Research Assistant: Geography, University of Exeter

2001 – 2002 Ecotoxicology Research Scientist: AstraZeneca

Links

Research group links

Research

Research interests

I have a broad background in environmental and aquatic biology, and work on collaborative projects between academia, industry and government bodies.

To date my research specialisms include:

• Aquatic (eco)toxicology; assessing the impacts of chemical, physical and biological stressors on aquatic organisms (e.g. fish); extrapolating effects measured in model species in the laboratory to adverse effects on wildlife populations and communities.

• Sustainable aquaculture development; understanding host-pathogen interactions in ecologically and commercially important diseases of aquaculture; developing molecular resources for use within the sector; developing more sustainable aquaculture practices both in the UK and globally.

Research projects

Improving hatchery biosecurity for a sustainable shrimp industry in Bangladesh.  This multidisciplinary project seeks to engage with the hatchery sector in the Bangladesh shrimp industry to improve biosecurity, thereby reducing the risk of disease, environmental impact and the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Funded by GCRF/BBSRC/NERC.

Intelligence-led Assessment of Pharmaceuticals in the Environment (WP5 – Experimental validation of developed models).

Determination of in vivo effects and internal concentrations in fish and fish embryos for the active pharmaceutical ingredient cinacalcet, with the aim of validating exposure and effects assessment models, concepts and frameworks. Funded by Innovative Medicines Initiative/European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme/EFPIA companies’ in kind contribution.

Building a molecular platform for understanding the host-pathogen interaction in invertebrates.

Developing molecular resources for use within the aquaculture sector (including for the shore crab (Carcinus maenas), European lobster (Homarus gammarus) and Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannamei)).

Using molecular tools to develop an understanding of the infection process for white spot syndrome virus, one of the most ecologically and commercially important diseases of crustacean aquaculture, with a view to developing strategies for the treatment or prevention of white spot disease. Funded by Cefas Seedcorn/University of Exeter’s Open Innovation Platform.

Develop and apply the use of genomics for environmental risk assessment within the pharmaceutical industry.

A Knowledge Transfer Partnership project with Astrazeneca. Developing functional genomics biomarkers as effects screens to be used in ecotoxicology (for environmental risk assessment) and toxicology (for human safety assessment). We used molecular approaches (including next generation sequencing) to investigate whether transcriptomic signatures detected following short-term exposure (2 days) to the pharmaceutical diclofenac were predictive of longer term (21 day) signatures and corresponding (adverse) phenotypic effects on kidney pathology in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a model laboratory fish. Funded by Knowledge Transfer Partnership/AstraZeneca.

Understanding the effects of inbreeding and chemical exposure in fish.

Understanding the combined effects of population inbreeding and exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish: both on individual fitness (survival, growth & reproductive development) and on reproduction (through competitive breeding studies). During this work we used inbred and outbred zebrafish (Danio rerio) to show that breeding history influences the susceptibility of laboratory zebrafish to endocrine disrupting chemical exposure effects. The results have useful insights in to the environmental relevance of using laboratory strains in ecotoxicology when addressing the consequences of exposure to chemical pollutants on the fitness of wild populations. Funded by NERC/AstraZeneca.

Applying in vitro techniques to investigate the effects of environmental contaminants in fish

Using vitellogenin induction (a biomarker of oestrogen exposure) in primary cultures of fish hepatocytes as an approach for screening chemicals for (anti-)oestrogenic activity, including both pharmaceuticals and pesticide compounds. Further comparative work was conducted to assess in vitro and in vivo responses. Funded by BBSRC/AstraZeneca.

Teaching

Supervision / Group

Back | Edit Profile