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Dr Sariqa Wagley

Dr Sariqa Wagley

Postdoctoral researcher

 Not Known

 Geoffrey Pope 

 

Geoffrey Pope Building, University of Exeter , Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QD, UK

I am a microbiologist with a strong interest on researching the molecular basis of infection by bacterial pathogens. I completed a BSc in Medical Microbiology from the University of Surrey. During this degree programme I completed a year in industry at the Cefas laboratories in Weymouth working on the microbiological safety of shellfish. During this placement I worked on a pilot project to develop methods to detect pathogenic Vibrio species in shellfish such as V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. My PhD studies were carried out at the Cefas laboratories (Weymouth, UK) in conjunction with the University of Surrey. Here, I worked on the human pathogen V. parahaemolyticus where I developed and standardised both molecular and classical approaches to the enumeration and characterisation of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in seafood’s, and to harmonise the use of those methods across the European Community.

After my PhD, I chose to move to a position with a strong molecular focus with Prof. Richard Titball at Exeter University. During my time at Exeter University I have focused my research and skillset on understanding microbial pathogenesis in a number of human pathogens including Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Campylobacter species and Clostridium perfringens. I am eager to combine the techniques from both my PhD and post-doctoral work to help further my own research on V. parahaemolyticus. I have recently been awarded a BBSRC IPA grant to help pursue my molecular interest in the viable but non-culturable state of V. parahaemolyticus and to study the role this phenomenon may have on food safety.  

Qualifications

PhD (2008) Cefas laboratories Weymouth UK/University of Surrey, Development of methods for the detection and characterisation of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood
BSc Hons (2004) Medical Microbiology, University of Surrey

Research

Research interests

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterium that is present in the marine environment and can be found in seawater, shellfish (such as oysters and mussels) and in crustacea (such as crab). This bacterium is the leading cause of seafood associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The bacterium can be destroyed during the cooking process, thus infection is generally associated with eating raw shellfish or cooked seafood products that have been cross-contaminated by raw shellfish or contaminated water. V. parahaemolyticus infections peak in the summer seasons, when sea temperatures are optimum for its growth. In the last 10 years the number of V. parahaemolyticus outbreaks has increased worldwide and has been as a result of rising sea temperatures. Climate change, globalisation and other drivers have also made Europe a hot spot for emerging infectious diseases including infections by V. parahaemolyticus.

At present, detection of V. parahaemolyticus is not required under EU Food Hygiene legislation for testing of shellfish harvesting areas and ready to eat seafood products. Furthermore, disease associated with V. parahaemolyticus is not notifiable in the EU but in recent years there have been a number of outbreaks associated with contaminated seafood in Europe including Spain, Italy and Norway that have begun to change the significance of this pathogen in Europe. I would like to develop my research to understand the molecular basis of infection of V. parahaemolyticus, how it survives in the environment, and to explore the epidemiological significance of this pathogen in UK environment.

Research projects

  • Understanding how the bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes disease
    • The role of viable but non-culturable cells of V. parahaemolyticus and its significance on food safety
    • Galleria mellonella as an alternative infection model for V. parahaemolyticus.
    • Exploring the epidemiological significance of V. parahaemolyticus in the environment
  • Understand the role of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin in Multiple sclerosis
  • Studying carbon utilisation in Campylobacter species
  • Understanding the role of a proteasome inhibitor (glbC) in Burkholderia pseudomallei
  • Identification and characterisation of the Twin Arginie Translocation system in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandenisis

Grants/Funding:

2016 – BBSRC IPA Research Grant ‘Uncovering the molecular basis of formation of viable but non-culturable cells’

2014 – GW4+ Innovation Primer Fund: ‘Using remote sensing modelling to monitor the incidence of the human pathogen V. parahaemolyticus in the UK.’

2012 - Researcher Led Initiatives Grant, University of Exeter. Workshop for early career researchers entitled ‘Women in Science Day: A workshop for young researchers’.

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Champion OL, Wagley S, Titball RW (In Press). Galleria mellonella as a model host for microbiological and toxin research. Virulence, 7(7), 840-845. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cizmeci D, Dempster EL, Champion OL, Wagley S, Akman OE, Prior JL, Soyer OS, Mill J, Titball RW (In Press). Mapping epigenetic changes to the host cell genome induced by Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals pathogen-specific and pathogen-generic signatures of infection. Sci Rep, 6 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Wagley S, Borne R, Harrison J, Baker-Austin C, Ottaviani D, Leoni F, Vuddhakul V, Titball RW (2018). Galleria mellonella as an infection model to investigate virulence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Virulence, 9(1), 197-207. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wagley S, Vanaporn M, Rinchai D, Conejero L, Lertmemongkolchai G, Bancroft GJ, Titball RW (2017). A proteasome inhibitor produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei modulates intracellular growth. Microb Pathog, 107, 175-180. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wagley S, Newcombe J, Laing E, Yusuf E, Sambles CM, Studholme DJ, La Ragione RM, Titball RW, Champion OL (2014). Differences in carbon source utilisation distinguish Campylobacter jejuni from Campylobacter coli. BMC Microbiol, 14 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Wagley S, Hemsley C, Thomas R, Moule MG, Vanaporn M, Andreae C, Robinson M, Goldman S, Wren BW, Butler CS, et al (2014). The twin arginine translocation system is essential for aerobic growth and full virulence of Burkholderia thailandensis. J Bacteriol, 196(2), 407-416. Abstract.  Author URL.
Powell A, Baker-Austin C, Wagley S, Bayley A, Hartnell R (2013). Isolation of Pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from UK Water and Shellfish Produce. Microbial Ecology, 65(4), 924-927. Abstract.
Roque A, Lopez-Joven C, Lacuesta B, Elandaloussi L, Wagley S, Furones MD, Ruiz-Zarzuela I, de Blas I, Rangdale R, Gomez-Gil B, et al (2009). Detection and identification of tdh- and trh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from four species of cultured bivalve molluscs on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast. Appl Environ Microbiol, 75(23), 7574-7577. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wagley S, Koofhethile K, Rangdale R (2009). Prevalence and potential pathogenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) harvested from the River Thames estuary, England. J Food Prot, 72(1), 60-66. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wheeler RW, Davies RL, Dalsgaard I, Garcia J, Welch TJ, Wagley S, Bateman KS, Verner-Jeffreys DW (2009). Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 isolates from mainland Europe and the UK likely represent different clonal groups. Dis Aquat Organ, 84(1), 25-33. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wagley S, Koofhethile K, Wing JB, Rangdale R (2008). Comparison of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from seafoods and cases of gastrointestinal disease in the UK. Int J Environ Health Res, 18(4), 283-293. Abstract.  Author URL.
Ellingsen AB, Jørgensen H, Wagley S, Monshaugen M, Rørvik LM (2008). Genetic diversity among Norwegian Vibrio parahaemolyticus. J Appl Microbiol, 105(6), 2195-2202. Abstract.  Author URL.
Nordstrom JL, Rangdale R, Vickery MCL, Phillips AMB, Murray SL, Wagley S, DePaola A (2006). Evaluation of an alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probe for the detection and enumeration of the thermostable-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. J Food Prot, 69(11), 2770-2772. Abstract.  Author URL.

Publications by year


In Press

Champion OL, Wagley S, Titball RW (In Press). Galleria mellonella as a model host for microbiological and toxin research. Virulence, 7(7), 840-845. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cizmeci D, Dempster EL, Champion OL, Wagley S, Akman OE, Prior JL, Soyer OS, Mill J, Titball RW (In Press). Mapping epigenetic changes to the host cell genome induced by Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals pathogen-specific and pathogen-generic signatures of infection. Sci Rep, 6 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2018

Wagley S, Borne R, Harrison J, Baker-Austin C, Ottaviani D, Leoni F, Vuddhakul V, Titball RW (2018). Galleria mellonella as an infection model to investigate virulence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Virulence, 9(1), 197-207. Abstract.  Author URL.

2017

Wagley S, Vanaporn M, Rinchai D, Conejero L, Lertmemongkolchai G, Bancroft GJ, Titball RW (2017). A proteasome inhibitor produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei modulates intracellular growth. Microb Pathog, 107, 175-180. Abstract.  Author URL.

2014

Wagley S, Newcombe J, Laing E, Yusuf E, Sambles CM, Studholme DJ, La Ragione RM, Titball RW, Champion OL (2014). Differences in carbon source utilisation distinguish Campylobacter jejuni from Campylobacter coli. BMC Microbiol, 14 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Wagley S, Hemsley C, Thomas R, Moule MG, Vanaporn M, Andreae C, Robinson M, Goldman S, Wren BW, Butler CS, et al (2014). The twin arginine translocation system is essential for aerobic growth and full virulence of Burkholderia thailandensis. J Bacteriol, 196(2), 407-416. Abstract.  Author URL.

2013

Powell A, Baker-Austin C, Wagley S, Bayley A, Hartnell R (2013). Isolation of Pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from UK Water and Shellfish Produce. Microbial Ecology, 65(4), 924-927. Abstract.

2009

Roque A, Lopez-Joven C, Lacuesta B, Elandaloussi L, Wagley S, Furones MD, Ruiz-Zarzuela I, de Blas I, Rangdale R, Gomez-Gil B, et al (2009). Detection and identification of tdh- and trh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from four species of cultured bivalve molluscs on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast. Appl Environ Microbiol, 75(23), 7574-7577. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wagley S, Koofhethile K, Rangdale R (2009). Prevalence and potential pathogenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) harvested from the River Thames estuary, England. J Food Prot, 72(1), 60-66. Abstract.  Author URL.
Wheeler RW, Davies RL, Dalsgaard I, Garcia J, Welch TJ, Wagley S, Bateman KS, Verner-Jeffreys DW (2009). Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 isolates from mainland Europe and the UK likely represent different clonal groups. Dis Aquat Organ, 84(1), 25-33. Abstract.  Author URL.

2008

Wagley S, Koofhethile K, Wing JB, Rangdale R (2008). Comparison of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from seafoods and cases of gastrointestinal disease in the UK. Int J Environ Health Res, 18(4), 283-293. Abstract.  Author URL.
Ellingsen AB, Jørgensen H, Wagley S, Monshaugen M, Rørvik LM (2008). Genetic diversity among Norwegian Vibrio parahaemolyticus. J Appl Microbiol, 105(6), 2195-2202. Abstract.  Author URL.

2006

Nordstrom JL, Rangdale R, Vickery MCL, Phillips AMB, Murray SL, Wagley S, DePaola A (2006). Evaluation of an alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probe for the detection and enumeration of the thermostable-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. J Food Prot, 69(11), 2770-2772. Abstract.  Author URL.

sariqa_wagley Details from cache as at 2018-04-20 02:02:20

Refresh publications

  • Teach on BIO2078 (Medical and General Biology)
  • Supervision of final year undergraduate research projects

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