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 Zenobia Lewis

Zenobia Lewis

Research Technician

 +44(0)1326 371872

 Daphne du Maurier 

 

Daphne du Maurier Building, University of Exeter,  Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK

Dr Lewis presenting a lecture in Japan

Dr Lewis presenting a lecture in Japan

I am an evolutionary biologist interested in the evolutionary ecology of sex. Here at the University of Exeter (Cornwall Campus) I work as a post-doctoral researcher/research technician. My main role is research; I am currently interested in how genitalia evolve in Drosophila flies.

Qualifications

2005 PhD University of Leeds, UK
2001 BSc University of Leeds, UK

Career

2009-present NERC funded postdoc, University of Exeter, UK, “The rapid evolution of male genitalia”, with Dr David Hosken
2008-2009 JSPS funded postdoctoral fellowship, University of Okayama, Japan, “Genomic conflict and the evolution of reproductive strategies in the Lepidoptera”, with Professor Takahisa Miyatake
2005-2008 Leverhulme Trust funded postdoc, University of Exeter, UK, “Parasitic bacteria, sexual selection and population dynamics”, with Professor Nina Wedell
2001-2005 BBSRC funded PhD, University of Leeds, UK, “Sexual selection and sexual conflict in the Lepidoptera”
 

Dr Lewis collecting moths from a grain store

Dr Lewis collecting moths from a grain store

Research

Research interests

My research falls within the fields of evolutionary biology and behavioural ecology. I use arthropod model systems to investigate questions in sexual selection, sexual conflict and reproductive biology.

Research projects

Sexual selection and genitalia
Genitalia are thought to be the fastest evolving morphological characters. While it is widely assumed that sexual selection is responsible for the rapid and divergent evolution of genitalia, there has been little empirical examination of this. I am currently investigating this topic in the fruit fly Drosophila simulans, in conjunction with David Hosken, Clarissa House, John Hunt, and David Hodgson (all Exeter).

Wolbachia and sexual selection
The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, is thought to infect up to 75% of terrestrial arthropods. Wolbachia is of importance to studies of sexual selection as the parasite manipulates host reproductive biology in order to increase its transmission, often with deleterious effects on the hosts fitness. In collaboration with Nina Wedell (Exeter), Steven Sait (Leeds) and Takahisa Miyatake (Okayama) I am investigating the effects of Wolbachia on the reproductive ecology of a number of butterfly and moth species.

Sexual selection and sexual conflict
Intralocus sexual conflict arises when traits shared by males and females are selected in opposite directions. Despite the importance of intralocus sexual conflict to the evolutionary process, few studies have conclusively demonstrated its operation. I am currently examining this in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, in collaboration with Nina Wedell (Exeter) and John Hunt (Exeter).

Research networks

Dr David Hosken, University of Exeter, UK
Dr Clarissa House, University of Exeter, UK
Professor Nina Wedell, University of Exeter, UK
Dr Thomas Price, University of Exeter, UK
Dr John Hunt, University of Exeter, UK
Dr David Hodgson, University of Exeter, UK
Professor Takahisa Miyatake, Okayama University, Japan
Dr Fleur Champion de Crespigny, Australian National University, Australia
Dr Steve Sait, University of Leeds, UK
Dr Chiharu Koshio, Naruto University of Education, Japan

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Ingleby FC, Lewis Z, Wedell N (In Press). Level of sperm comeptition promotes evolution of male ejaculate allocation patterns in a moth. Animal Behaviour Abstract.
Price TAR, Lewis Z, Smith DT, Hurst GDD, Wedell N (In Press). Sex ratio drive promotes sexual conflict and sexual coevolution in the fly Drosophila pseudoobscura. Evolution, 64(5), 1504-1509. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Brakefield PM, Wedell N (2010). Speed or sperm: a potential trade-off between development and reproduction in the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). European Journal of Entomology, 107(1), 55-59. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Wedell N (2009). Male moths reduce sperm investment in relatives. Animal Behaviour, 77(6), 1547-1550. Abstract.
Price TAR, Lewis Z, Wedell N (2009). Sperm dumping as a defense against meiotic drive. Journal of Biology, 8 Abstract.
Price TAR, Hodgson DJ, Lewis Z, Hurst GDD, Wedell N (2008). Selfish genetic elements promote polyandry in a fly. Science, 322(5905), 1241-1243. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Price TAR, Wedell N (2008). Sperm competition, immunity, selfish genes and cancer. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 65(20), 3241-3254. Abstract.
House CM, Lewis Z (2007). Dispatch: Genital Evolution: Blurring the Battle Lines between the Sexes. Current Biology, 23(17), R1013-R1014. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Wedell N (2007). Effect of Adult Feeding on Male Mating Behaviour in the Butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Journal of Insect Behavior, 20(2), 201-213. Abstract.

Publications by year


In Press

Ingleby FC, Lewis Z, Wedell N (In Press). Level of sperm comeptition promotes evolution of male ejaculate allocation patterns in a moth. Animal Behaviour Abstract.
Price TAR, Lewis Z, Smith DT, Hurst GDD, Wedell N (In Press). Sex ratio drive promotes sexual conflict and sexual coevolution in the fly Drosophila pseudoobscura. Evolution, 64(5), 1504-1509. Abstract.

2010

Lewis Z, Brakefield PM, Wedell N (2010). Speed or sperm: a potential trade-off between development and reproduction in the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). European Journal of Entomology, 107(1), 55-59. Abstract.

2009

Lewis Z, Wedell N (2009). Male moths reduce sperm investment in relatives. Animal Behaviour, 77(6), 1547-1550. Abstract.
Price TAR, Lewis Z, Wedell N (2009). Sperm dumping as a defense against meiotic drive. Journal of Biology, 8 Abstract.

2008

Price TAR, Hodgson DJ, Lewis Z, Hurst GDD, Wedell N (2008). Selfish genetic elements promote polyandry in a fly. Science, 322(5905), 1241-1243. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Price TAR, Wedell N (2008). Sperm competition, immunity, selfish genes and cancer. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 65(20), 3241-3254. Abstract.

2007

House CM, Lewis Z (2007). Dispatch: Genital Evolution: Blurring the Battle Lines between the Sexes. Current Biology, 23(17), R1013-R1014. Abstract.
Lewis Z, Wedell N (2007). Effect of Adult Feeding on Male Mating Behaviour in the Butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Journal of Insect Behavior, 20(2), 201-213. Abstract.

zenobia_lewis Details from cache as at 2018-10-21 16:05:57

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