Latest news

Leatherback turtle spotted off Cornwall

A leatherback turtle has been spotted off the coast of Cornwall – the first confirmed sighting of a live leatherback in UK waters this year.

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New technique can show links between prey and microplastics

A brand new method has been developed to investigate links between top predator diets and the amount of microplastic they consume through their prey, offering potential insights into the exposure of animals in the ocean and on land to microplastics.

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Eden Project event marks massive clean-up of plastic on pristine Indian Ocean atoll of Aldabra

Environmental champions from the Seychelles, Oxford and Cornwall met at the Eden Project to show what the paradise island of Aldabra can teach the world about the scourge of ocean plastic.

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Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food

Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.

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Robot cameras reveal secret lives of basking sharks in UK marine conservation first

An autonomous ‘SharkCam’ has been used in the UK for the first time to observe the behaviour of basking sharks in the Inner Hebrides.

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Staring at seagulls could save your chips

Staring at seagulls makes them less likely to steal your food, new research shows.

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Road verges provide refuge for pollinators

Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators – but they must be managed better, new research shows.

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Study reveals how bacteria beat immune systems

The evolution of more severe infections is not necessarily driven by bacteria multiplying faster, new research shows.

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Using weather radar to monitor insects

Scientists are developing a pioneering technique that allows them to monitor insects in the air using weather radars, as part of a research project called BioDAR.

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Privatization of public goods can cause population decline, research shows

Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the way microbes adopt a ‘co-operative’ approach to securing the nutrients they need to thrive.

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Explore nature’s mysterious hidden worlds

Delve into the hidden world of microorganisms, discover the strange creatures that lurk in the deep ocean and the frozen continent, and be amazed by secretive glowing animals at this year’s Science in the Square.

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Exeter experts help shape report into future ‘non-toxic environment’ for the UK

Experts from the University of Exeter have played a pivotal role in shaping a new Government report to combat exposure to toxic chemicals in the home.

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‘Intensive’ beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases

More “intensive” beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests.

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No new males: Climate change threat to Cape Verde turtles

Rising temperatures could mean no male loggerhead turtles hatch at a key breeding ground by the end of this century, new research suggests.

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Overfishing plus climate change equals threat to fisheries

Overfishing increases the threat posed by climate change to fish stocks and fisheries, according to a new report for MPs.

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Hundreds of sharks and rays tangled in plastic

Hundreds of sharks and rays have become tangled in plastic waste in the world’s oceans, new research shows.

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‘Gentle recovery’ of Brazil’s leatherback turtles

Brazil’s leatherback turtles are making a “gentle recovery” after 30 years of conservation efforts, new research shows.

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It’s dog eat dog on the canine social ladder

Climbing the social ladder is a ruff business for dogs, new research shows.

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Crop pests more widespread than previously known

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.

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Colour change and behaviour enable multi-coloured chameleon prawns to survive

Chameleon prawns change colour to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.

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Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

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Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk

A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows.

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Migratory hoverflies ‘key’ as many insects decline

Migratory hoverflies are “key” to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.

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OBE for scientist demonstrating devastating impact of plastic pollution

OBE for scientist demonstrating devastating impact of plastic pollution

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Exeter scientist wins world’s biggest science communication competition

A University of Exeter scientist has won FameLab International, a global competition to find the best new science communicators.

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‘Loser effect’ evolves separate from fighting ability

The “loser effect” – which causes animals to shy away from violence after losing a fight – evolves independently of any change in fighting ability, new research suggests.

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Crabs’ camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

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Wolf-dog ‘swarms’ threaten Europe’s wolves

“Swarms” of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe’s wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research.

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Older male crickets attract more females – but have less sex

Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them – but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.

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Penguins and their chicks’ responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation

How adult penguins fish and the body condition of their chicks are directly linked to local fish abundance, and could potentially inform fishery management, a new study has found

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Five rules to tackle antibiotic resistance

Current efforts to tackle antibiotic resistance are “not nearly radical enough”, a leading scientist says.

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Exeter research technician wins award

A University of Exeter technician has won the Higher Education Bioscience Technician of the Year Award 2019.

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Scientist to face royals and Dragons

A Devon scientist will face royalty and the stars of TV show Dragons’ Den in a competition for entrepreneurs.

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Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks

Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates – even though it harms the flock.

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Exeter experts join Ganges plastic pollution mission

Two University of Exeter scientists will be part of an international team studying plastic pollution in the River Ganges.

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Banana disease boosted by climate change

Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows.

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Early intervention could be key to battling invasive species

An international team of ecologists has carried out the first global meta-analysis of the characteristics and size of invasive alien species’ impacts on native species as invaders become more abundant.

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Explore Cornwall’s fascinating wildlife at this year’s BioBlitz Penryn

Join a team of students at the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus for a day filled with interactive wildlife activities for all the family.

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Plymouth beavers plan – what do you think?

Scientists want to know what the people of Plymouth think about plans to release beavers into a fenced enclosure in the city.

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Banned pesticides in Europe’s rivers

Tests of Europe’s rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides – including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.

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Exeter marine expert awarded prestigious medal for scientific contribution

One of the world’s foremost experts in fish ecology and bioacoustics has been awarded a prestigious prize from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

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Do crickets have personalities?

Do some crickets like to get up early, while others prefer staying up late?

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Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

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Complex artefacts don’t prove brilliance of our ancestors

Artefacts such as bows and arrows do not necessarily prove our ancestors had sophisticated reasoning and understanding of how these tools worked, new research suggests.

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Classrooms invited to join live Arctic adventure

Young people around the world will get the chance to explore the Arctic via live broadcasts from researchers.

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Marine conservation scientist wins ZSL award

A scientist who specialises in marine turtle research has won an award from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London).

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Exeter experts give insight into environmental impacts of modern-day lifestyle choices on award-winning series

University of Exeter experts will give a fascinating insight into environmental impacts of modern-day lifestyle choices when they appear on the BBC’s latest Blue Planet UK series.

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Exeter researchers feature in Royal Society special issue on CRISPR

Researchers based at the Environment and Sustainability Institute have guest edited and published in a new special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

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Colourful male fish have genes to thank for their enduring looks

Striking traits seen only in males of some species – such as colourful peacock feathers or butterfly wings – are partly explained by gene behaviour, new research suggests.

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Buying and selling cattle can link individual farms to thousands of other farms with each purchase

Understanding the complex networks of “contact chains” between British farms, could help identify potential routes for spread of infections and improve disease control strategies for the cattle industry.

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UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now…

Wildlife conservation charity urges private amphibian traders to prevent Bsal fungus from infecting wild populations

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Wanted: Pet owners whose cats take a walk on the wild side

The University of Exeter is seeking cat owners to become researchers for a new study designed to test different techniques to reduce the amount of wildlife killed by domestic cats, while maintaining and improving cat health and welfare.

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World leading researchers give insight into link between evolutionary medicine and early life effects

The quest to determine why people experience different long-term reactions to adversity in early life has received a new, ground-breaking boost.

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Understanding the rich social lives of animals benefits international conservation efforts

An international group of researchers working on a wide range of species, from elephants and crows, to whales and chimpanzees, argues that animals’ cultural knowledge needs to be taken into consideration when planning international conservation efforts.

 

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Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock

Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows.

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Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain

Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.

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Live long and prosper: Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of ‘silver spoon effect’

The benefits of the ‘silver spoon effect’ in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.

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Location, location, location: Proximity to the mainland determines how coral reef communities respond to major environmental disturbances

Severe weather and environmental disturbances, such as cyclones or thermal coral bleaching, affect specific areas of coral reefs differently, new research has shown.

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Exeter researcher awarded Pew Fellowship to discover if commercial fishing harms endangered penguin populations

Experts will work to discover if commercial fishing is harming endangered African penguins by making it harder to forage for food in the ocean.

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Exeter expert backs calls for bold national Plastic Packaging Plan to help protect oceans

One of the world’s foremost experts in microplastics research has backed calls for a bold new national policy framework to help reduce the amount of ocean plastic pollution.

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How hunting for crabs in a museum helped unlock secrets of their evolution

Sara Mynott, PhD researcher in Marine Ecology from the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK

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Skyglow over key wildlife areas

Light pollution affects the skies over most of the world’s key wildlife areas, new research shows.

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Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony

The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs), is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found.

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Endangered sharks being eaten in UK

Endangered species of hammerhead and dogfish are among the sharks being sold as food in the UK, researchers have revealed.

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Plastic in Britain’s seals, dolphins and whales

Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain’s shores.

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Global antibiotic manufacturing discharge limits guided by Exeter researchers

The Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Industry Alliance has adopted the recommendations made by Exeter scientists for the setting of antibiotic manufacturing discharge targets around the globe.

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Wild insects ‘get old’ before they die

Short-lived wild insects “get old” – losing some of their physical abilities – before they die, new research shows.

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Exeter neuroscience expert secures prestigious award

A neuroscience expert from the University of Exeter has secured a prestigious Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to pioneer new research into the function of neural circuits.

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Roaming cats prey on their owners’ minds

Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.

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First Fulbright Scholar takes Cornish research overseas

A Masters student and recipient of the first Fulbright scholarship for the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus, is hoping her work on pollinator research in Cornwall will have a positive impact on conserving pollinators in the U.S. territory of Guam and the wider Mariana Islands in the western North Pacific Ocean. 

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Warming warning over turtle feminisation

Up to 93% of green turtle hatchlings could be female by 2100, as climate change causes “feminisation” of the species, new research suggests.

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Warning over deep-sea ‘gold rush’

A “gold rush” of seabed mining could lead to unprecedented damage to fragile deep-sea ecosystems, researchers have warned.

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Crucial environmental research receives major funding boost

Pioneering new research on major environmental issues, led by scientists from the University of Exeter, have received a major funding boost, it has been announced.

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Drones help map sea level rise

Drones can be used to create low-cost and accurate 3D maps of coastal areas, new research shows.

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Exeter research ranked among the most influential of 2018

Research conducted by Exeter experts has been recognised amongst the top 100 influential in 2018.

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Rudolph ‘not bullied for red nose’

Rudolph the reindeer probably wasn’t bullied for his crimson snout – because he and his fellow reindeer can’t see red.

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Scientists secure prestigious awards for global impact of microplastics research

A team of researchers has won two prestigious awards for the impact of work highlighting the presence, and potential impacts, of microplastics in our oceans.

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Microplastics found in all sea turtle species

Tests on more than 100 sea turtles – spanning three oceans and all seven species – have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle.

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Christmas dinner a ‘global feast’

Christmas dinner is an international evolutionary feast – with only the humble carrot native to British soil, a leading scientist says.

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Exeter researcher wins photography prize

A University of Exeter researcher has won a photography prize from the British Ecological Society.

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Exeter fungal experts win prestigious awards

Two University of Exeter researchers have won prestigious awards for their work in mycology.

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‘Bee-lief’ in wildflowers’ value to courgette pollination

A pioneering new study has revealed the value of pollination services to courgette.

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Study reveals why older women are less healthy than older men

Genes that act late in life could explain why women have poorer health than men in older age, according to new research.

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Frogs breed young to beat virus

Frogs from groups exposed to a deadly virus are breeding at younger ages, new research suggests.

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Exeter experts help in hunt for new antibiotic drugs

Exeter scientists are part of an international team helping to find new antibiotic drugs to treat killer infections.

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Marine and citizen scientists take to the seas to help secure a future for Atlantic bluefin tuna in UK waters

Cefas and University of Exeter have launched a bluefin tuna tagging programme to try and find out more about the migration patterns of these enigmatic predators.

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Students find way to make oxygen on Mars

University of Exeter students have found a way to produce oxygen on Mars, earning a gold medal at a prestigious competition.

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Exeter expert shortlisted for NERC Impact Awards 2018

4,000 tons of microbeads no longer released into ocean after pioneering plastics research

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Costing the Earth: fertility declines in humans and wildlife

Popular BBC Radio 4 show ‘Costing the Earth’ interviewed Professor Charles Tyler of the University of Exeter to shed light on the causes and consequences of documented fertility declines in both humans and wildlife.

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Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides

Up to 13% of US beekeepers are in danger of losing their colonies due to pesticides sprayed to contain the Zika virus, new research suggests.

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Powerful film highlighting the impact of plastic pollution in the Arctic showcased

A powerful film made by campaigners showing the impact of plastic pollution in the Arctic Ocean will be shown in Cornwall.

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Birds startled by moving sticks

Do animals – like humans – divide the world into things that move and things that don’t? Are they surprised if an apparently inanimate object jumps to life?

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Societies can remain distinct despite migration

Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.

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Research gives new insight into the evolution of the nervous system

Pioneering research has given a fascinating fresh insight into how animal nervous systems evolved from simple structures to become the complex network transmitting signals between different parts of the body.

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Exeter student sparks Galapagos fire kit donation

Firefighters on one of the Galapagos Islands will wear UK fire brigade kit thanks to a surprising series of events sparked by a University of Exeter student.

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University of Exeter postgraduate receives prestigious fellowship from the WWF

An Exeter Student has been awarded a prestigious fellowship to further her research into the threats river dolphins face from fisheries and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon.

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Asian hornets: First UK use of radio tags to find nest

Electronic radio tags have been used for the first time on the UK mainland to help find a nest of invasive Asian hornets, which was then destroyed.

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Research into equine vision leads to trial of new fence and hurdle design to further improve safety in jump racing

The colours deployed on hurdles and fences on British racecourses may be set to change following cutting-edge research led by the University of Exeter into the way that horses perceive colour.

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Future European science leaders to work on cutting-edge peroxisome research

The EU funded Marie Sklodowska Curie Innovative Training Network PerICo has announced the start of a new, four-year, research programme on Peroxisome Interactions and Communication.

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How did the fish cross the road? Our invention helps them get to the other side of a culvert

Harriet Goodrich, PhD student at the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK.

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Why a ‘cuckoo in the nest’ can go undetected

Researchers at the Universities of Exeter and Cambridge have shed light on why some species cannot tell the difference between their own offspring and those of intruders that have been slipped into their nests.

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Microplastics found deep in sand where turtles nest

Microplastics have been found deep in the sand on beaches where sea turtles lay their eggs.

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Bird bacteria study reveals evolutionary arms race

A study of a songbird and a bacterium that infects it has revealed how species in conflict evolve in response to each other.

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Burly bird gets the worm

The pecking order of garden birds is determined by their size and weight, new research shows.

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Why do baboons floss?

A student from the University of Exeter is studying some surprising behaviour in baboons at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park.

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‘Simple solutions’ to help rebuild coral reef ecosystems

The future of coral reefs was discussed at a workshop in Indonesia.

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Male and female tennis players decline at same rate

The physical abilities of male and female tennis stars decline at the same rate as they age, new research shows.

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Wild dolphins learn tricks from each other

Dolphins learn tricks from each other in the wild, new research shows.

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South East Asia and Australia face fall armyworm threat

Countries including China, Indonesia and Australia all face a “high threat” of invasion by the fall armyworm, new research shows.

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Study confirms truth behind ‘Darwin’s moth’

Scientists have revisited – and confirmed – one of the most famous textbook examples of evolution in action.

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Revealed: a novel transport mechanism for Wnt proteins

A novel, self-governed transport system for Wnt cell signalling proteins has been discovered by Benjamin Mattes and Dr Steffen Scholpp at the University of Exeter.

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Discovering why basking sharks go to Scotland

Scientists seeking to discover whether Scotland’s seas are a mating ground for basking sharks have filmed new footage showing the sharks being sociable.

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Plastic found in stomach of dead turtle on Cornish beach

Plastic has been discovered in the stomach of a leatherback turtle found dead on a Cornish beach on Sunday.

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Weird science served up in Falmouth

A jellyfish that looks like a fried egg and a crab that can live on land for 40 years are among the subjects for this year’s Science in the Square.

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Fall armyworm will continue to spread

A devastating crop pest called the fall armyworm – discovered this week in India – will continue to spread, a researcher says.

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Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key

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Night-time lighting changes how species interact

Night-time lighting from streetlights and other sources has complex and unexpected effects on communities of plants and animals, new research shows.

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Cornish seal skeleton to go on display

The skeleton of a huge seal that washed up on a Cornish beach will go on display at the University of Exeter on Friday.

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Acidic oceans cause fish to lose their sense of smell

Fish are losing their sense of smell because of increasingly acidic oceans caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, new research shows.

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Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from climate change

Sheltered pockets of cooler and more variable conditions in the British countryside may help native species

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Viruses cooperate to overcome immune defences of bacteria

Virus particles that infect bacteria can work together to overcome antiviral defences, new research shows.

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Cranes here to stay, new model predicts

The UK’s tallest bird – the common crane – is here to stay and the UK could have as many as 275 breeding pairs within 50 years, a new study says.

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LED lights reduce seabird death toll from fishing by 85 per cent, research shows

Illuminating fishing nets with low-cost lights could reduce the terrible impact they have on seabirds and marine-dwellers by more than 85 per cent, new research has shown.

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Stop antibiotics before resistance ‘tipping point’

Treatments using antibiotics should stop as soon as possible to prevent patients becoming resistant, new research shows.

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Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking

Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonising the UK

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‘The eyes have it’- photoreceptors in marine plankton form a depth gauge to aid survival

The eyes of some marine-dwelling creatures have evolved to act like a “depth gauge”, allowing these creatures to swim in the open ocean at a certain depth .

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More woodland management needed to help save dormice

Managing woodlands to a greater extent could help stop the decline of Britain’s dormice, new research suggests.

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Increase in storms could have ‘catastrophic impact’ on fishing industry

Potential changes in the frequency and intensity of storms off the coast of the UK and around the world could have a “catastrophic impact” on the livelihood of fishermen and sustainability of fishing industries, research led by the University of Exeter has shown.

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All-female crew set for Pacific plastic pollution voyage

An all-female crew is set to embark on a mission across the Pacific to learn more about plastic pollution.

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Micro-plastics in the Antarctic

Antarctica’s most remote and pristine habitats are contaminated with micro-plastic waste

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Turtle tagged in Brazil reaches UK territory

A turtle tagged by University of Exeter scientists in Brazil has swum thousands of miles.

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Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years on

Milk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country’s official safe limit

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Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals

Plants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows.

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Public invited to quiz sea turtle experts

Top scientists will answer your questions about sea turtles in a live online Q&A on Friday (June 8).

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Thousands of turtles netted off South America

Tens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America’s Pacific coast, new research shows.

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Mixed signals from poisonous moths

Poisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them

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Cautious prawns win battle for food

Prawns have personalities – and cautious crustaceans do better in the battle for food, new research shows.

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Could Galapagos become plastic pollution free?

There is a growing movement in Galapagos to drastically reduce marine plastic pollution with the aim, one day, of having a plastic-free Galapagos Marine Reserve.

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Mongooses inherit behaviour from role models rather than parents

Young mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows.

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Public can help create night map of Earth

Researchers are asking the public to help them create the first high-resolution photographic map of Earth at night.

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‘Virtual safe space’ to help bumblebees

The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a “virtual safe space” created by scientists at the University of Exeter.

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Resistance to antifungal drugs could lead to disease and global food shortages

Growing levels of resistance to antifungal treatments could lead to increased disease outbreaks and affect food security around the world.

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Climate-threatened animals unable to relocate

Many of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.

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Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutans

Orangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and large-scale farming, may face another threat 

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Exeter academic to lead new journal

A University of Exeter academic will lead a new international journal published by the British Ecological Society.

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Angry birds: Size of jackdaw mobs depends on who calls warning

Jackdaws recognise each other’s voices and respond in greater numbers to warnings from familiar birds than strangers, new research shows.

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Discovery of immune cells able to defend against mutating viruses could transform vaccine development

Scientists have found immune cells can fight different strains of the same virus – a discovery which could help transform vaccine development.

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Deteriorating Great Barrier Reef hushed: young fish no longer hear their way home

Degraded coral reefs are far quieter than five years ago, and no longer sound like a suitable habitat to young fish searching for a place to live and breed, according to research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.

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“Blue light” of LED streetlights linked to breast and prostate cancer

The “blue light” emitted by street lights including LEDs, and commercial outdoor lighting such as advertising, is linked to a significant increase in the risk of breast and prostate cancer, innovative new research has concluded.

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Guardian award for policy-changing research on microplastic pollution

Research that revealed the devastating impact that microplastic pollution could have on the health of humans and wildlife has won a Guardian University Award.

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Multiple sclerosis may be linked to sheep disease toxin

Exposure to a toxin primarily found in sheep could be linked to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans, new research suggests.

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Crowded urban areas have fewer songbirds per person

People in crowded urban areas – especially poor areas – see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential “nuisance” birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows.

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Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species

Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species – raising the risk that they will “jump” from one species to another, new research shows.

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Droughts mean fewer flowers for bees

Bees could be at risk from climate change because more frequent droughts could cause plants to produce fewer flowers, new research shows.

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Coral bleaching threatens the diversity of reef fish

New research shows that coral bleaching not only whitewashes corals, but can also reduce the variety of fish occupying these highly-valued ecosystems.

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Experts team up to study bluefin tuna and confirm return to UK waters

Atlantic bluefin tuna are known for being amongst the biggest, fastest and most valuable fish in the sea.

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Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall

Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around – and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows.

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Breakthrough in battle against rice blast

Scientists have found a way to stop the spread of rice blast, a fungus that destroys up to 30% of the world’s rice crop each year.

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Exeter gets two Entrepreneurs in Residence

The University of Exeter now has two Entrepreneurs in Residence, appointed as part of a new Royal Society scheme.

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Breakthrough could aid development of bee-friendly pesticides

Efforts to create pesticides that are not toxic to bees have been boosted by a scientific breakthrough.

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All-female crew to sail Pacific on plastics research mission

An all-female crew including sailors, scientists and film-makers will cross the north Pacific later this year to study plastic pollution.

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Experience trumps youth among jumping fish

Tiny jumping fish can leap further as they get older, new research shows.

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Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds

Mongooses living in large groups develop “specialist” diets so they don’t have to fight over food, new research shows.

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Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubber plantations

Efforts to protect tropical forests in Southeast Asia for the carbon they store may fail because protection payments are too low, according to new research.

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Stunning footage shows how drones can boost turtle conservation

Drones are changing the face of turtle research and conservation, a new study shows.

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First evidence that marine top predators are exposed to microplastics via their prey

Microplastics can transfer up the food chain from fish to top predators, such as seals, new research shows.

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Conflict between males and females could replace evolution of new species

New research shows that males and females of the same species can evolve to be so different that they prevent other species from evolving or colonising habitats.

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Biodiversity loss raises risk of ‘extinction cascades’

New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of “extinction cascades”, where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions. 

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The mysteries of the deep: behind the scenes of BBC Blue Planet II

One of the most startling sequences from Blue Planet II was the result of a ‘fisherman’s tale’, according to a scientific adviser to the series, speaking at the University of Exeter. 

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Forgotten crop pathogen may be about to return

Scientists, breeders, farmers and conservation groups must continue to work in close collaboration to prepare for the potential re-emergence of a forgotten crop pathogen, a new study says.

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Large-group living boosts magpie intelligence

Growing up in a large social group makes Australian magpies more intelligent, new research shows.

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UK chalk-stream salmon genetically unique

Salmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique, researchers have discovered.

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Pulling power reveals new insights into membrane dynamics in human cells

Scientists have discovered how the movement and membrane dynamics of a specific organelle – called peroxisomes – are mediated. 

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Seabed mining could destroy ecosystems

Mining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world.

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No-fishing zones help endangered penguins

Small no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows.

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Orangutans, like people, use medicinal plants to treat joint and muscle inflammation

Scientists have discovered that the same plant used by indigenous people on Borneo is also used by wild orangutans to treat joint and muscle inflammation.

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